Computing Science

Will my degree be recognised?

A degree in computing science obtained with the European Union and at good universities outside the EU will be recognised. However it is important to check the programmes offered by different universities to find the most suitable degree as content of topics taught can be different to the UK.

Does it make sense to study computing science abroad?

It depends on your career motivations.

Long gone are the days when computer science students all graduated to become software developers and IT support technicians. Everywhere you look, computer technologies have a hand in pushing society forwards. This increasing scope of computer science means you're likely to find your skills in high demand across many different industries. These include: financial organisations, aerospace companies, medical device providers, news agencies and game studios.

In response to the growing role that computer technologies play in all sectors of the economy, many universities worldwide have started offering computer science students a wide variety of specialisations within their Bachelor's degrees.

The entertainment industry is one of the fastest growing and most exciting career choices of the future. The International Game Architecture and Design at Breda University of Applied Science is a great option for those who are fascinated with game development. On the other hand, the Computer Science in Real-Time Interaction Simulation four-year course at DigiPen Institute of Technology focuses extensively on the technical aspects of computer graphics and simulations. It prepares you to work in the computer and video game industry as intermediate-level programmers in graphics, artificial intelligence and networking.

Artificial Intelligence and Big Data are changing decision and policy making and creating new business opportunities. The incredible amount of data generated by new technologies can bring competitive advantages for companies, ranging from better customer communication to increased process efficiency. As a student of the Economics, Management and Computer Science programme at Universita Bocconi, you will learn how to acquire, organise and process data through theoretical models. The quantitative skills that you will develop during this four-year programme will give you a head start on getting a job in the financial sector.

Developing cool apps for moble phones. Produce 3D images of an MRI scan. Programme a computer system to find the quickest travel route. These are only a few things that you will learn to do in the 3-year course BSc in Computer Science at the University of Groningen. With the problem-solving approach being at the core of every teaching and learning activity at Groningen, many computer science students have also secured project management roles upon graduation.

What grades do I need to get in?

This differs in terms of the university and the country you decide to go to. Keep in mind, there are world class universities where you will need world class grades just as there are in the United Kingdom. It is a safe assumption that you will need to have A levels in maths and other relevant subjects in order to be able to study computing science at university.

What else should I bear in mind?

As already mentioned, we think the most important thing for you to consider is whether your degree is recognised. After you have clarified that, then you have the choice of some excellent universities world-wide. Other considerations include financial matters as most universities abroad do not provide financial aid during the studies. But this also depends on the chosen university, that’s why it is important to research study opportunities aboard thoroughly before making a decision.

Some thoughts from computer science students at overseas universities...

Charlie Thorpe


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About A Star Future

A Star Future provides information and guidance to British students looking to pursue their undergraduate studies abroad.

Through our presentations in schools and our websites we aim to ensure that British-educated students are well informed about their choices.